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The Fallen of Kirkby

Isaac Allen Knight

Church Cottage (photo courtesy Christine Cooper)
Church Cottage (photo courtesy Christine Cooper)
  • Son of William and Ann Knight of Church Cottage, Beckside.
  • Gunner, 283394, 23rd Siege Battery, Royal Garrison Artillery. Enlisted in Burnley Lancashire, the town of his birth.
  • Died of Wounds in No 3 Australian Casualty Clearing Station, France, 1st May 1918, aged 36. Buried in Esquelbecq Military Cemetery, Nord, France, Block 2, Row A, Grave 9.

Mr Knight was a farm labourer, and in 1901 he and his wife, Ann, lived with seven of their eight children in the cottage that forms part of the boundary of St Cuthbert’s Church graveyard in Beckside. Also living with them for a time was William’s father, Thomas, a retired farm labourer. In 1911 Isaac, aged 28 and still single, had left home and was boarding with a fellow iron ore miner, John Johnson and his wife Susannah, at 6 Bell Hill, Marton, near Ulverston. Mr Knight was also living-in in 1911, at Ringhouse Farm in Woodland, where he worked for the Cowards.

According to Andy Moss, Gunner Isaac Knight had been a Special Reservist, No. 8394, serving in India as a regular soldier with the 15th Hussars for seven years before the war, and two years in Ireland. Once that service was over, Isaac Knight emigrated to New Zealand, while his younger brother, William, who was to survive the war, chose Australia. Both came back to Europe with the Anzac Expeditionary Force. Once back in England, Isaac enlisted, under the Derby Scheme, in the local regiment, The Kings Own Royal Lancasters. After training from January to November 1916 Gunner Isaac Knight went to France and Flanders, now with the Royal Garrison Artillery.

The dreaded telegram that duly arrived in Beckside
The dreaded telegram that duly arrived in Beckside
Esquelbecq Military Cemetery is in the Nord Départment of France. Buried in this beautifully-kept Commonwealth War Graves cemetery on the edge of the little town of Esquelbecq are 569 British and Canadian casualties, alongside seven Germans.
Esquelbecq Military Cemetery is in the Nord Départment of France. Buried in this beautifully-kept Commonwealth War Graves cemetery on the edge of the little town of Esquelbecq are 569 British and Canadian casualties, alongside seven Germans.

William Knight

Isaac’s younger brother, William, served with the forces of the Commonwealth of Australia as a driver, and survived the war, although he was wounded in action in April 1918 and not discharged until May 1920, aged 28 years and 3 months. He returned to Australia on the SS Ascania with the 10th Australian Battalion. Upon discharge William Knight gave his address as Beckside, Kirkby-in-Furness, and his trade as ‘farmer’. His military record shows that he served 5 years and 232 days, returning to London where he was finally discharged on 10th March 1920.

William’s Attestation Papers show that he gave his next of kin as Mrs B. Knight of 3 Tyson Street, Barrow-in-Furness.

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